Search Results for: prostate

Important Developments for Advanced Prostate Cancer

  • Advanced Prostate Cancer treatment

Here are some important developments, surrounding treatment options for advanced prostate cancer, that we are keeping a watchful eye on. A new androgen receptor inhibitor drug, darolutamide, may soon be a treatment option for patients with non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (nmCRPC). Non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer is a clinical state in which men who are being treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) see their PSA levels begin to rise (indicating the cancer has become resistant to ADT and is starting to grow again), but no metastases are visible yet on scans.

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

  • Prostate cancer awareness

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month; in light of that we’d like to share the following information, courtesy of the Urology Care Foundation.

Only men have a prostate gland. This walnut-shaped gland sits below the bladder. The prostate surrounds the urethra, the tube that carries urine out of your body.

Robotic Assisted Prostatectomy Surgery

  • prostatectomy robotic surgery in new jersey

Robotic prostatectomy surgery is minimally invasive, it carries many benefits over traditional open surgery such as more precise removal of cancerous tissue, faster recovery and return to normal activities, and lower risk of complications and wound infection.

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

  • Prostate cancer awareness

Men, take care of yourself the way you take care of your car… Preventive maintenance is key! Prostate cancer, if caught early, is 99 percent curable. Because September is Prostate Cancer Awareness month, there’s a campaign to raise awareness called the Pushup Challenge. You may not realize it, due to all the media attention focused on breast cancer, but prostate cancer occurs just as frequently as breast cancer. In fact, it’s the second most  common cause of cancer death in men. What can you do? First and foremost, get a checkup once a year, every year. Early detection is easier than you think, consisting of a simple blood test (PSA) and/or a digital rectal exam (DRE). From a prevention standpoint, there are a few easy lifestyle habits that can help prevent prostate cancer… In a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, men who ate more than two servings of tomato sauce a week had a lower risk of prostate cancer than those who ate less than a serving per month. It is thought that certain compounds in the cooked tomatoes may shield DNA strands from breakage. Recent Finnish research finds that consuming more than 3 alcoholic drinks per week results in a higher risk of prostate cancer than for individuals consuming 3 or less. As the body metabolizes alcohol, it creates carcinogenic molecules, which are only okay in moderation. You really shouldn’t need another reason to quit smoking but… research indicates that smokers are more likely to die of prostate cancer than those that have never smoked. One possible factor is that carcinogens from tobacco smoke may promote the creation of tumors. A study in the British Journal of Nutrition found that men eating the most legumes (roughly 6 ounces/week) had half the prostate cancer risk of those consuming less. As the body digests the fiber in beans, it decreases inflammation, which may play a role in the development of tumors. For more information about prostate cancer, including detection, symptoms, and treatment options, call us, at 609.924.6487 to schedule an appointment.

Preventing & Detecting Prostate Gland Issues

  • Prostate cancer patient services

September, aka National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, is over but prostate health is a year round concern. Here are some important things to keep in mind… Prevention Although some foods have been linked with reduced risk of prostate cancer, at least for now, proof that they really work is lacking. Therefore, instead of focusing on specific foods, strive for an overall pattern of healthy eating. Eat multiple servings (shoot for 5) of fruits and vegetables every day. Choose whole-grain bread, pasta, and cereals. Limit your consumption of red meat and processed meats. Choose fish, skinless poultry, beans, and eggs for healthy sources of protein. Consume healthful fats, such as olive oil, nuts (almonds, walnuts, pecans), and avocados. Limit saturated and partially hydrogenated fats. Avoid sugar-sweetened drinks, such as sodas and many fruit juices. Cut down on salt by choosing foods low in sodium. Avoid overeating… Eat slowly and stop when you are full. In addition to eating healthy, stay active. Regular exercise reduces your risk of developing some deadly problems, including heart disease, stroke, and certain types of cancer. Though relatively few studies have directly assessed the impact of exercise on prostate health, those that have been done have concluded, for the most part, that exercise is beneficial. Detection In the early stages, prostate cancer does not cause symptoms, which is why it is important to have an annual digital rectal exam (DRE) along with a blood test to check your prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Elevated levels do not necessarily indicate prostate cancer; however, your results may indicate the need for further testing. As with any form of cancer, early detection provides for the best long-term results and most treatment options. Other, non-cancerous, prostate issues, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and various forms of prostatitis, may cause symptoms including, but definitely not limited to, difficulty urinating, dribbling, pain, and the urge to frequently urinate. If you have any concerns, are experiencing symptoms, or are in need of your annual DRE & PSA tests, please call the Urology Group of Princeton to schedule an exam.

September is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

  • Prostate cancer awareness

September is National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month. Did you know that, after skin cancer, prostate cancer is the most common cancer among men? But, as is also true with skin cancer, the good news is that there are ways to help reduce your risk. Four easy lifestyle habits to help prevent prostate cancer: Enjoy Italian Food In a study in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, men who ate more than two servings of tomato sauce a week had a lower risk of prostate cancer than those who ate less than a serving per month. It is thought that certain compounds in the cooked tomatoes may shield DNA strands from breakage. Drink Responsibly Recent Finnish research finds that consuming more than 3 alcoholic drinks per week results in a higher risk of prostate cancer than for individuals consuming 3 or less. As the body metabolizes alcohol, it creates carcinogenic molecules, which are only okay in moderation. Quit Smoking You really shouldn’t need another reason to quit but… research indicates that smokers are more likely to die of prostate cancer than those that have never smoked. One possible factor is that carcinogens from tobacco smoke may promote the creation of tumors. Beans, Beans, the Magical Fruit Recently, a study in the British Journal of Nutrition found that men eating the most legumes (roughly 6 ounces/week) had half the prostate cancer risk of those consuming less. As the body digests the fiber in beans, it decreases inflammation, which may play a role in the development of tumors. For more information about prostate cancer, including detection, symptoms, and treatment options, visit our website to learn more about prostate cancer or call us, at 609.924.6487 to schedule an appointment.

The Urology Group of Princeton to begin using MRI Fusion Biopsies for Prostate Cancer Detection

  • MRI Fusion Biopsy

As part of our ongoing commitment to offer patients the very best, most state-of-the art care available, the Urology Group of Princeton will soon incorporate MRI Fusion Biopsies to greatly improve the care of, and improve the outcomes for, our patients. Prostate cancer remains the second most common cancer-related cause of death in men (lung cancer is #1) and early detection and treatment is essential. This innovative, new procedure, which combines MRI and ultrasound to create a 3D image of the prostate, is confirmed by research to more accurately locate suspicious areas and make a prostate cancer diagnosis. Known technically as MRI-TRUS (magnetic resonance imaging/transrectal ultrasound) Fusion Targeted Prostate Biopsy, this procedure requires special imaging capabilities and highly trained radiologists and urologists. If, after screening by a urologist, a patient is identified as at risk for prostate cancer, a radiologist uses a state-of-the-art MRI examination to identify potentially suspicious areas of the gland. If suspicious areas are present, the MRI images are sent to a device that blends them with live ultrasound images to create a 3D model and flag anomalies. This data is used by urologists to obtain samples (i.e. biopsies) of the tissue in question and determine whether cancer is present. The greatly improved precision of the MRI Fusion procedure, ensures patients and physicians are better informed when choosing the best, most appropriate treatment option, helps to avoid surgery in patients with less aggressive cancers, and ensures that patients with a more aggressive form of the disease are identified earlier. Screening for prostate should be discussed with all men starting at age 40 and involves a rectal exam and a simple blood test referred to as Prostate Specific Antigen (PSA). If the results of these tests indicate the need for a biopsy, the Urology Group of Princeton is proud to offer our patients the MRI Fusion Procedure as part of our commitment to ensure they receive the highest level of care possible.

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month!

Prostate Cancer Awareness Month is about being aware and informed because prostate cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death of men in the United States (lung cancer is #1). The good news though is that, if diagnosed early, the five-year survival rate is almost 100 percent. While there is currently is no way to prevent prostate cancer, there are recommendations that may reduce your risk. And, as an added benefit, it is believed that these recommendations actually help reduce the risk for most forms of cancer. Eat healthy and choose a low-fat diet Eat plenty of fruits, vegetables, and whole grains Maintain a healthy weight Stay physically active Avoid tobacco Get regular checkups/screenings Regular checkups/screenings are particularly important because prostate cancer generally doesn’t have early symptoms. Also, the symptoms that may show (e.g. difficult/painful urination, trouble getting an erection, etc.), can be the same as for other non-cancerous conditions; this makes prostate cancer hard to diagnose from symptoms alone. Given that, the Urology Group of Princeton recommends an annual checkup/screening consisting of a digital rectal exam (DRE) and a prostate specific antigen (PSA) test. A DRE is a test where the doctor puts a gloved finger in the rectum to feel the prostate. A PSA test is a blood test that can find a prostate related problem. Abnormalities found in either test may indicate the need for additional testing such as urinalysis, genomic/genetic testing, imaging, and biopsy. Early detection is the key; call the Urology Group of Princeton at 609.924.6487 to schedule your prostate cancer screening.

Robotic Prostatectomy Surgery

  • prostatectomy robotic surgery in new jersey

Robotic prostatectomy surgery is minimally invasive, it carries many benefits over traditional open surgery such as more precise removal of cancerous tissue, faster recovery and return to normal activities, and lower risk of complications and wound infection.