Blog

Valentine’s Day is around the corner, will ED keep you from rising to the occasion?

At some, most men will experience problems getting or keeping an erection for a variety of reasons, which are not always due to an actual physical issue. Stress or anxiety can cause erection issues; however, some men do develop a medical condition called erectile dysfunction, or ED. Erectile dysfunction is a condition that occurs when the penis does not receive enough blood to produce an erection adequate for sexual intercourse. ED is diagnosed when this happens repeatedly and affects a man’s ability to sustain an active sex life. While erectile problems are commonly thought to be an issue for older men, ED can, and does, affect younger men too. If you suffer from ED, the good news is that there are many treatment options available. Counseling Life-impacting issues or even everyday stress can trigger erectile dysfunction. Talking about them with a licensed therapist can ease sexual anxiety and help you feel more confident. Medication ED medicines, generally pills (e.g. Levitra, Cialis, Viagra) are usually the first thing prescribed to men with erectile dysfunction. Taken anywhere from 15 minutes to 36 hours before sex, depending on the product, they work well for about 80% of men experiencing ED. If the pills don’t work, or aren’t safe for you to take, your doctor may prescribe a drug (alprostadil) that helps boost blood flow to the penis, triggering an erection within minutes. It is administered by injection or suppository pellets placed inside the penis. Penile Pump/Vacuum A penile pump/vacuum device improves firmness by boosting blood flow to the penis. About 80% of men who use the device correctly get an erection hard enough for sex. Often used for penis rehabilitation, usually after prostate surgery, your doctor will design a regimen aimed at restoring normal blood flow to the penis, thereby allowing for a spontaneous erection. It may, however, take several months to see results. Surgery If all other ED treatments have failed, your doctor may recommend surgery; i.e. an implant (prosthesis) in the penis or vascular reconstruction surgery. The causes of ED vary widely; they can be caused by psychological, neurological, or lifestyle […]

Happy New Year

  • Happy New Year

Happy New Year, from The Urology Group of Princeton! To kick off 2021, we’re providing a brief overview of urology courtesy of the Urology Care Foundation. What is Urology? Urology is a part of health care that deals with a lot of different body parts. This includes body parts that form the Urinary System and Male Reproductive System. If you have a problem with a body part in these two systems, you may need to see a urologist. The Urinary System Many of your body parts work with each other to form the Urinary System. Urine is taken out of the body if these parts work with each other in the right order. This allows normal urination to happen. For both men and women, the main parts of the system are Kidneys, Ureters, Bladder and Urethra. Urine is produced in the kidneys. It flows through tubes called ureters, and into the bladder. Urine leaves the body through the urethra. How the Kidneys Work The kidneys are fist-size organs that make urine. They are found on both sides of the spine behind the liver, stomach, pancreas and bowels. Healthy kidneys work like clockwork to turn extra water and waste into urine. How the Ureters Work Urine flows out of the kidneys and into the ureters. Ureters are thin tubes of muscle that connect the kidneys to the bladder. Ureters carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder. How the Bladder Works The bladder is a hollow, balloon-shaped organ. It is mostly made of muscle. It stores urine until you are ready to go to the bathroom to release it. The bladder helps you urinate. The brain tells it to tighten and force the urine out. How the Urethra Works Urine leaves the body through a hollow tube connected to the bladder. This tube is called a urethra. The Male Reproductive System Many body parts work with each other to form the Male Reproductive System. The purpose is for each part to work in the right order so a male can have sex. During sex, you may be able to fertilize a […]

10 Foods Your Bladder Will Fall in Love With

The Urology Group of Princeton is please to share this excellent, informative article from the Urology Care Foundation. If you have a sensitive bladder, you will not have to miss out on tasty foods this fall. The key is to know which foods are more likely to irritate your bladder and which ones are more likely to soothe. In general, you will want to avoid coffee, alcohol, citrus fruits, tomato-based products, artificial sweeteners and spicy foods. Read on to learn about 10 bladder-friendly foods. Pears. They are good fall fruits that generally begin to ripen in September and sometimes October depending on the region. Pears are a good source of fiber and about 100 calories per serving. Bananas. Typically available in grocery stores year-round, bananas are great as snacks, toppings for cereals or in smoothies. Green beans. At about 31 calories per 1-cup serving, green beans will add some color to your plate. You can eat them raw, add them to salads or roast them with a little olive oil. Winter squash. Do not let the name fool you. Winter squash are available in both fall and winter. Squash varieties include acorn, butternut and spaghetti. Potatoes. Need a bladder-friendly comfort food when the weather cools down? Try white potatoes or sweet potatoes (yams). Lean proteins. Examples include low-fat beef, pork, chicken, turkey and fish. Especially when baked, steamed or broiled, they are unlikely to bother your bladder. Whole grains. Quinoa, rice and oats are just a few examples of whole grains. They come in many varieties and are generally not expensive. Breads. Overall, breads are bladder-friendly and a nice addition to meals. Bread is also great for delicious turkey sandwiches after Thanksgiving. Nuts. Almonds, cashews and peanuts are healthy snacks and rich in protein. Eggs. Also rich in protein, eggs are on several lists as one of the “least bothersome” foods for bladder conditions. For more information, or to discuss urology related symptoms or concerns, please contact us, at 609.924.6487, or click here, to schedule an appointment.

Meet Our Doctors

Our greatest satisfaction comes from taking care of our patients. Our goal is to provide them with the highest level of expertise, as well as continuity of care.

Dr. Barry Rossman

Dr. Barry Rossman

M.D.

Read More
Dr. Alexander Vukasin

Dr. Alexander Vukasin

M.D.

Read More
Dr. Karen Latzko

Dr. Karen Latzko

D.O.

Read More
Dr. Alexi Wedmid

Dr. Alexei Wedmid

M.D.

Read More