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Grow a Mo, Save a Bro!

Meant to inspire donations, conversations, and real change for men’s health issues, the phrase “Grow a Mo, Save a Bro” is the slogan for Movember, aka No-Shave November or Mustache November. This month long, annual event began in Australia, in 2004, when a group of friends decided to raise awareness of the need for early cancer detection, diagnosis and effective treatments for men. Ultimately, they hoped to reduce the number of preventable deaths faced by men. To raise awareness, they encourage men to grow a mustache to remind each of us of the importance of men’s health. Since 2003, The Movember Foundation has empowered millions of men and women to join the global men’s health movement. The connections created and the conversations generated have helped to raise over $700 million and helped fund more than 1,200 breakthrough men’s health projects in 21 countries! Movember 2017 is focused on three specific health issues to men: Prostate cancer Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men in the U.S. This walnut-sized and shaped gland tends to grow bigger as a man ages. If detected early, men have a 98% chance of survival beyond five years. If detected late, men have only a 26% chance of survival beyond five years. Testicular cancer Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men aged 15-34 in the U.S. In most cases, the outcome for men with testicular cancer is very good — a 95% chance of survival. Mental health and suicide prevention Statistically, three out of four suicides are men. Although Movember shines a spotlight on these often overlooked men’s issues, every day of the year should be a day devoted to awareness and prevention of prostate and testicular cancers as well as depression and suicide. Here are some positive steps we can all take… Stay connected with other male friends to catch up and check in on one another. Have open conversations; be there for each other, listening and giving of your time. At the age of 40, talk to your doctor about prostate cancer and having a prostate specific antigen (PSA) […]

November is Bladder Health Awareness Month

  • Bladder health awareness month

November is Bladder Health Awareness Month and we’d like to remind you that The Urology Group of Princeton now offers Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation (PTNS) as an adjunct to patients with overactive bladder (OAB) for whom behavioral therapy or pharmacology has not sufficiently addressed the associated symptoms of urinary urgency, urinary frequency, and urge incontinence. Also known as Posterior Tibial Nerve Stimulation, PTNS is a minimally invasive supplementary treatment option for overactive bladder that has been found to be effective at reducing the number of times a person with OAB needs to urinate. Performed as an out-patient procedure, PTNS requires 30-minute treatments once-a-week for 12 weeks and may require ongoing treatments, every 3-weeks or so, to sustain the improvements. For many of our patients, improvements are noticeable by the 6th week. PTNS is a low-risk procedure; the most common side-effects are temporary and minor. For a more detailed description of the procedure and possible side-effects, please refer to our earlier post entitled “Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation for Overactive Bladder”. For more information on Percutaneous Tibial Nerve Stimulation and to find out if it is right for you, please contact the Urology Group of Princeton, at 609.924.6487, to schedule a consultation.

Preventing & Detecting Prostate Gland Issues

  • Prostate cancer patient services

September, aka National Prostate Cancer Awareness Month, is over but prostate health is a year round concern. Here are some important things to keep in mind… Prevention Although some foods have been linked with reduced risk of prostate cancer, at least for now, proof that they really work is lacking. Therefore, instead of focusing on specific foods, strive for an overall pattern of healthy eating. Eat multiple servings (shoot for 5) of fruits and vegetables every day. Choose whole-grain bread, pasta, and cereals. Limit your consumption of red meat and processed meats. Choose fish, skinless poultry, beans, and eggs for healthy sources of protein. Consume healthful fats, such as olive oil, nuts (almonds, walnuts, pecans), and avocados. Limit saturated and partially hydrogenated fats. Avoid sugar-sweetened drinks, such as sodas and many fruit juices. Cut down on salt by choosing foods low in sodium. Avoid overeating… Eat slowly and stop when you are full. In addition to eating healthy, stay active. Regular exercise reduces your risk of developing some deadly problems, including heart disease, stroke, and certain types of cancer. Though relatively few studies have directly assessed the impact of exercise on prostate health, those that have been done have concluded, for the most part, that exercise is beneficial. Detection In the early stages, prostate cancer does not cause symptoms, which is why it is important to have an annual digital rectal exam (DRE) along with a blood test to check your prostate-specific antigen (PSA) level. Elevated levels do not necessarily indicate prostate cancer; however, your results may indicate the need for further testing. As with any form of cancer, early detection provides for the best long-term results and most treatment options. Other, non-cancerous, prostate issues, such as benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) and various forms of prostatitis, may cause symptoms including, but definitely not limited to, difficulty urinating, dribbling, pain, and the urge to frequently urinate. If you have any concerns, are experiencing symptoms, or are in need of your annual DRE & PSA tests, please call the Urology Group of Princeton to schedule an exam.

Meet Our Doctors

Our greatest satisfaction comes from taking care of our patients. Our goal is to provide them with the highest level of expertise, as well as continuity of care.

Dr. Barry Rossman

Dr. Barry Rossman

M.D.

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Dr. Alexander Vukasin

Dr. Alexander Vukasin

M.D.

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Dr. Karen Latzko

Dr. Karen Latzko

D.O.

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Dr. Alexi Wedmid

Dr. Alexei Wedmid

M.D.

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