Blog

Dr. Rosenberg is retiring

  • Dr. Stanley Rosenberg

To our valued patients, Dr. Rosenberg, the founder of the Urology Group of Princeton, has announced his retirement after 50+ years of dedicated service. He will be greatly missed by his colleagues and patients. We are very grateful for the outstanding care he provided to our patients and hope you will join us in wishing him the very best in all his upcoming endeavors. Please remember that our staff is ready to answer your questions and provide assistance as you make your next appointment. As always, we are honored to be your urology health partner!

Incontinence: Bladder Control Issues

  • Bladder control problem

Approximately 25 million Americans are affected by bladder control issues; i.e. incontinence. Because incontinence is a symptom, as opposed to an actual disease, the method of treatment is completely dependent on a diagnosis of the underlying cause. Successful treatment is attainable and generally entails a combination of medication, behavior modification, pelvic muscle exercises, collection devices, and absorbent products. But, despite a very high success rates in treating incontinence, most people affected do not seek help, either due to embarrassment or from the mistaken notion that nothing can be done. For any urinary control issues, the first step is to find a knowledgeable physician, with whom you feel comfortable, to get a diagnosis. The clinicians and board-certified physicians and surgeons at the Urology Group of Princeton are highly trained and up-to-date on the latest advances in the field; they will attend to your condition with respect and understanding as they take the time to simply and completely explain the diagnosis and treatment options to you. If you are experiencing any of the conditions described below, please call our Urology Group, at 609.924.6487, to set up an appointment. Urinary Incontinence Overactive Bladder – The overwhelming need to go immediately. Urinary Retention – Difficultly starting urination, a weak and, once finished, the need to go again because the bladder isn’t fully emptied. Mixed Incontinence – A combination of stress incontinence, including muscle and sphincter related issues, and urgency incontinence. Stress urinary incontinence (SUI) – Because of weak pelvic floor muscles and/or a deficient urethral sphincter, the bladder can leak during exercise, coughing, sneezing, laughing, or any body movement that puts pressure on the bladder. Nocturnal Enuresis aka Bedwetting Persistent Primary Nocturnal Enuresis – this condition, which begins during childhood, is defined as the inability to achieve nighttime dryness for longer than 6 months. About 2-3% of adults older have this type of nocturnal enuresis. Adult Onset Secondary Enuresis – This condition is defined as bedwetting affecting people usually closer to 60 years of age. Nocturia – Generally defined as making two or more trips to the bathroom every night. Nocturnal Polyuria – This […]

Kidney Stones and Roller Coasters: Perfect Together?

  • Kidney stone treatment & roller coasters

After hearing stories, from several patients, of passing a kidney stone after visiting an amusement park, two researchers from Michigan State University College of Osteopathic Medicine began to suspect a connection. And after one patient in particular reported passing a stone on each of three consecutive rides (i.e. 3 rides, 3 kidney stones passed), they knew they were on to something. To test the assumption, the urologists used a 3D printer to create a life-size plastic replica of the branching interior of a human kidney into which they inserted three kidney stones, of the size that will generally pass on their own, along with human urine. Then, with permission from an amusement park official, they put the artificial kidney in a backpack and took it for a series of rides. The results showed that the forces and vibrations encountered on the coaster did indeed cause the kidney stones to dislodge from the replica kidney. The optimal place to be was in the back of the coaster; 64% of the kidney stones passed during rides in the rear car, as compared to only about 17% passing after a single ride in the lead car. Although this very preliminary study doesn’t prove that real kidneys with real stones will have the same results, coupled with the anecdotal evidence from patients, it is an intriguing possibility that should warrant further study. In the meantime, if you have questions or concerns about kidney stones, contact the Urology Group of Princeton to schedule an appointment. The board certified physician/surgeons at the Urology Group are highly trained to evaluate your symptoms, perform applicable tests, and develop the proper treatment plan.

Meet Our Doctors

Our greatest satisfaction comes from taking care of our patients. Our goal is to provide them with the highest level of expertise, as well as continuity of care.

Dr. Barry Rossman

Dr. Barry Rossman

M.D.

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Dr. Alexander Vukasin

Dr. Alexander Vukasin

M.D.

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Dr. Karen Latzko

Dr. Karen Latzko

D.O.

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Dr. Alexi Wedmid

Dr. Alexei Wedmid

M.D.

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