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September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month

September is Prostate Cancer Awareness Month; in light of that we’d like to share the following information, courtesy of the Urology Care Foundation. WHAT IS PROSTATE CANCER? Only men have a prostate gland. This walnut-shaped gland sits below the bladder. The prostate surrounds the urethra, the tube that carries urine out of your body. Prostate cancer is when abnormal cells in your prostate grow out of control. Prostate cancer cells can form a tumor in your gland and spread by breaking away from the tumor. They can travel through blood vessels or lymph vessels to reach other parts of the body. After spreading, cancer cells may attach to other organs and tissues and grow to form new tumors, causing damage where they land. OTHER CONDITIONS OF THE PROSTATE Prostatitis and Chronic Pelvic Pain – are conditions that cause inflammation in the prostate and pain around the penis and groin with urination. Enlarged Prostate or Benign Prostatic Hyperplasia (BPH) – is a condition where the prostate becomes large and starts to cause urinary and other problems. SHOULD I BE SCREENED? “Screening” means testing for a disease even if you have no symptoms. The choice to be screened for prostate cancer is a personal one, and it should be taken seriously. It begins with a conversation with your doctor about your risk for the disease, including your personal and family history. Then, a talk about the benefits and risks of testing. Generally, screening is recommended for men with no symptoms who are between the ages of 55 to 69. Some men who are at higher risk for prostate cancer should consider screening as early as age 40-45. This group includes smokers, African American men and men with a father, brother or son who has had prostate cancer. WHAT ARE THE SCREENING TESTS FOR PROSTATE CANCER? Digital Rectal Exam (DRE): a physical test to feel the prostate for problems. Prostate-Specific Antigen (PSA): a blood test to measure this protein found in the prostate. A low PSA score is a sign of a healthy prostate. A rapid rise in scores may signal a problem […]

Robotic Assisted Prostatectomy Surgery

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Robotic prostatectomy surgery is minimally invasive, it carries many benefits over traditional open surgery such as more precise removal of cancerous tissue, faster recovery and return to normal activities, and lower risk of complications and wound infection.

No-Scalpel Vasectomy

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A vasectomy prevents pregnancy better than any other method of birth control, except abstinence. Statistics show that around 600,000 men, in the United States alone, choose vasectomy for birth control each year. The no-scalpel vasectomy, originally developed in China in 1974 and first introduced in the United States in 1984, is an innovative approach that is less traumatic and results in less pain and fewer postoperative complications than a traditional vasectomy. This technique performs the vasectomy through a puncture made in the scrotum. The puncture is so small that it seals itself after the procedure, eliminating the need for stitches and resulting in less discomfort, quicker procedure time, and a decreased risk of surgical complications. Another benefit of this approach is that a numbing agent is administered via an anesthetic spray, applied to the scrotal skin and the vas deferens itself, rather than via a needle. The entire procedure takes about 10-30 minutes, depending on the surgeon’s technique and the patient’s anatomy. For more information, or to schedule a consultation, please call The Urology Group of Princeton at 609.924.6487.

Meet Our Doctors

Our greatest satisfaction comes from taking care of our patients. Our goal is to provide them with the highest level of expertise, as well as continuity of care.

Dr. Barry Rossman

Dr. Barry Rossman

M.D.

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Dr. Alexander Vukasin

Dr. Alexander Vukasin

M.D.

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Dr. Karen Latzko

Dr. Karen Latzko

D.O.

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Dr. Alexi Wedmid

Dr. Alexei Wedmid

M.D.

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