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Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs)

A urinary tract infection (UTI) is an infection in any part of the urinary system. Although most UTIs involve the lower urinary tract, i.e. the bladder and the urethra, UTIs can also occur in the kidneys and ureters. Although UTIs occur in both women and men, women have a greater risk of developing this type of infection. Painful and annoying when the UTI is limited to the bladder, serious consequences can occur if the infection spreads to the kidneys. Urinary tract infections typically occur when bacteria enter the urinary tract through the urethra and begin to multiply in the bladder. Although the urinary system is designed to keep out such microscopic invaders, these defenses sometimes fail. When that happens, bacteria may take hold and grow into a full-blown infection in the urinary tract. The most common UTIs occur mainly in women and affect the bladder and urethra. Infection of the bladder (cystitis) This type of UTI is usually caused by Escherichia coli (E. coli), a type of bacteria commonly found in the gastrointestinal (GI) tract. However, sometimes other bacteria are responsible. Sexual intercourse may lead to cystitis, but it can develop without sexual activity as well. All women are at risk of cystitis because of their anatomy; specifically, the short distance from the urethra to the anus and the urethral opening to the bladder. Infection of the urethra (urethritis) This type of UTI can occur when gastrointestinal bacteria spread from the anus to the urethra. And, because the female urethra is close to the vagina, sexually transmitted infections, such as herpes, gonorrhea, chlamydia, and mycoplasma, can cause urethritis. Urinary tract infections are typically treated with antibiotics; however, there are measures you can take to reduce your chances of getting a UTI in the first place, such as… Drink plenty of liquids, especially water. Drinking water helps dilute your urine and ensures that you’ll urinate more frequently, which flushes bacteria from your urinary tract before an infection can begin. Drink cranberry juice. Studies are inconclusive that cranberry juice prevents UTIs, but it is likely not harmful and, again, will help flush […]

March is National Kidney Awareness Month

  • Kidney Awareness Month

March is National Kidney Awareness Month; a great time to give some thought to your kidneys, along with a well-deserved checkup. Your kidneys, two fist-sized organs located in the lower back, maintain overall health by… Filtering waste from over 50 gallons of blood every day. Regulating the body’s salt, potassium and acid content. Removing drugs from the body. Balancing the body’s fluids. Releasing hormones that regulate blood pressure. Producing an active form of vitamin D that promotes strong, healthy bones. Controlling the production of red blood cells. However, while performing those amazing functions in the body, kidneys are also prone to disease. In fact, 1 in 3 Americans are at risk for kidney disease due to diabetes, high blood pressure, or a family history of kidney failure. Kidney disease is the 9th leading cause of death in the country. More than 30 million Americans already have kidney disease and, unfortunately, many don’t know it because there are often no symptoms until the disease has progressed. It’s, therefore, very important to get tested annually; early detection and treatment can slow or prevent the progression of kidney disease. There are two tests to determine the health of the kidneys: Urine Test – Urine is tested for the presence of albumin, a type of protein. While your body certainly needs protein, it should be in your blood, not your urine. Having protein in your urine may mean that your kidneys are not filtering your blood well enough, which can be a sign of early kidney disease. If your urine test comes back “positive” for protein, the test will be repeated; three positive results, over three months or more, is a sign of kidney disease. Blood Test – Blood is tested for a waste product called creatinine, which comes from muscle tissue. When the kidneys are damaged, they have trouble removing creatinine from your blood. The result of this test is entered into a math formula, along with your age, race, and sex, to find out your glomerular filtration rate (GFR). The GFR result is a measure of how well your kidneys are working. […]

Valentine’s Day is around the corner, will ED keep you from rising to the occasion?

At some, most men will experience problems getting or keeping an erection for a variety of reasons, which are not always due to an actual physical issue. Stress or anxiety can cause erection issues; however, some men do develop a medical condition called erectile dysfunction, or ED. Erectile dysfunction is a condition that occurs when the penis does not receive enough blood to produce an erection adequate for sexual intercourse. ED is diagnosed when this happens repeatedly and affects a man’s ability to sustain an active sex life. While erectile problems are commonly thought to be an issue for older men, ED can, and does, affect younger men too. If you suffer from ED, the good news is that there are many treatment options available. Counseling Life-impacting issues or even everyday stress can trigger erectile dysfunction. Talking about them with a licensed therapist can ease sexual anxiety and help you feel more confident. Medication ED medicines, generally pills (e.g. Levitra, Cialis, Viagra) are usually the first thing prescribed to men with erectile dysfunction. Taken anywhere from 15 minutes to 36 hours before sex, depending on the product, they work well for about 80% of men experiencing ED. If the pills don’t work, or aren’t safe for you to take, your doctor may prescribe a drug (alprostadil) that helps boost blood flow to the penis, triggering an erection within minutes. It is administered by injection or suppository pellets placed inside the penis. Penile Pump/Vacuum A penile pump/vacuum device improves firmness by boosting blood flow to the penis. About 80% of men who use the device correctly get an erection hard enough for sex. Often used for penis rehabilitation, usually after prostate surgery, your doctor will design a regimen aimed at restoring normal blood flow to the penis, thereby allowing for a spontaneous erection. It may, however, take several months to see results. Surgery If all other ED treatments have failed, your doctor may recommend surgery; i.e. an implant (prosthesis) in the penis or vascular reconstruction surgery. The causes of ED vary widely; they can be caused by psychological, neurological, or lifestyle […]

Meet Our Doctors

Our greatest satisfaction comes from taking care of our patients. Our goal is to provide them with the highest level of expertise, as well as continuity of care.

Dr. Barry Rossman

Dr. Barry Rossman

M.D.

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Dr. Alexander Vukasin

Dr. Alexander Vukasin

M.D.

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Dr. Karen Latzko

Dr. Karen Latzko

D.O.

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Dr. Alexi Wedmid

Dr. Alexei Wedmid

M.D.

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