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Don’t Skip Your Immunizations; Here’s Why…

The COVID-19 pandemic has necessitated postponing a lot of things: however, immunizations, including the flu vaccine, should not be one of them. As a vital part of your health care, it’s important to adhere to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) 2020 immunization schedules. We recommend getting the flu vaccine as soon as you can as it is quite possible to get the flu and COVID-19 simultaneously. If you haven’t had the flu vaccine and get symptoms, you may dismiss them as the flu when, in fact, you may have COVID-19. And having both the flu and COVID-19 simultaneously increases your risk of complications; especially if you have other health issues, such as lung problems, diabetes, or a compromised immune system. If you’re concerned about visiting a health care provider during the pandemic, keep in mind that most providers have put strict protocols in place to maintain patient and staff safety. If you’re not sure, call ahead and ask. From an altruistic perspective, vaccines aren’t only about giving you immunity and protecting you from an infection; they’re also about preventing you from spreading an infection. So, not only are you protecting yourself, you’re protecting your loved ones, your friends, and your community. As always, to discuss specific urological concerns or symptoms, please contact us, at 609.924.6487, or click here, to schedule an appointment.

September is Urology Awareness Month

September is Urology Awareness Month. Organized by The Urology Foundation, Urology Awareness month aims to raise awareness of urological diseases as well as raise money to fund vital research and training into these diseases. It is estimated that 1 in 2 of people will be affected by a urological condition in their lifetime. Urology health is vital to everyone’s quality of life; but diseases and cancers of the kidneys, bladder, prostate and the male reproductive system appear to be occurring more frequently, sometimes devastating the lives of those impacted. The Urology Group of Princeton offers a variety of state-of-the-art treatments for the following urological conditions: Kidney Stones Urological Cancers: Prostate Bladder Kidney Testicular Penile Voiding Dysfunction BPH (Benign Prostate Hyperplasia) Urinary Incontinence and Voiding Dysfunction Urinary Tract Infections Hematuria (blood in the urine) Interstitial Cystitis Chronic Pelvic Pain Syndrome / Prostatitis Benign Male Urologic Care Male Infertility/Fertility Erectile Dysfunction Low Testosterone & Testosterone Replacement Therapy Hydrocele/Spermatocele Circumcision Genital Warts/ Lesions Additional In-Office Services include:  Ultrasound (kidney, bladder, prostate, testicular) Ultra-sensitive prostate specific antigen (PSA) testing Urine cultures (CLIA certified lab, w/PhD bacteriologist) Video cystoscopy (patient can observe on a TV screen) Urodynamics (full physiologic evaluation of voiding dysfunction) Biofeedback and electrical stimulation for incontinence Visit our Services page for more information on some of the available treatment options for each of the above urological conditions. For more urology information, or to discuss specific urological concerns or symptoms, please contact us, at 609.924.6487, or click here, to schedule an appointment.

TRT: Is It Right For You?

The Urology Group of Princeton is please to share this excellent, informative article from the Urology Care Foundation. Men with a low sex drive, fading energy, mood changes and erectile dysfunction may have low testosterone levels, also known as low-T. However, these symptoms can be caused by other reasons (multi-factorial). Ongoing research is trying to determine what symptoms go with low-T. So while there are a variety of medications to treat low-T, not everyone is a candidate, according to Charles Welliver, M.D., Assistant Professor of Urology at Albany Medical College. What is Low-T? During puberty, the male sex hormone, testosterone helps boys develop male physical features like body and facial hair, deeper voices and muscle strength. Testosterone is also needed for men to make sperm. When a man does not have enough testosterone in his body it is called hypogonadism, or low-T. Levels of the hormone normally decrease with age. About 4 out of 10 men over the age of 45 have low testosterone. It is seen in about 2 out of 10 men over 60, 3 out of 10 men over 70, and 3 out of 10 men over 80 years old. Men with certain health problems, including diabetes and obesity, also tend to also have low testosterone. You may have low-T if you have the following: anemia (low iron) depressed mood or irritability fewer and weaker erections less energy less muscle mass and strength loss of calcium from bones low sex drive more body fat If you think you may have low-T, it is important to see a doctor to make sure you have low-T and not another condition. Many of the symptoms for low-T can be the result of other health problems. For example, decreased energy and depressed mood may be caused by a variety of different health conditions and not of low-T. Diagnosis of low-T begins with a review of your medical history, a physical exam and blood work to measure your testosterone levels. TRT treatments in New Jersey If the symptoms of low-T are bothering you, talk with your doctor about whether or not you […]

Meet Our Doctors

Our greatest satisfaction comes from taking care of our patients. Our goal is to provide them with the highest level of expertise, as well as continuity of care.

Dr. Barry Rossman

Dr. Barry Rossman

M.D.

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Dr. Alexander Vukasin

Dr. Alexander Vukasin

M.D.

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Dr. Karen Latzko

Dr. Karen Latzko

D.O.

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Dr. Alexi Wedmid

Dr. Alexei Wedmid

M.D.

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