Blog

April is Testicular Cancer Awareness Month

  • Testicular Cancer awareness month

This month, we’d like to share the following article, courtesy of the Urology Care Foundation. April is Testicular Cancer Awareness month. According to the American Cancer Society (ACS), testicular cancer is relatively rare . Roughly 1 out of every 250 men will develop the disease in their lifetime. However, the incidence rate of testicular cancer has been on the rise over the past several decades, and an estimated 9,310 men will be diagnosed in the United States this year. Top 5 Questions to Ask Your Doctor One of the most important things you can do after being diagnosed is to have an ongoing, open dialogue with your doctor to make sure you stay informed and active about your care. Here is a list of questions to bring to your appointment. Tip: bring a notebook to write down their answers, or plan to record them on your phone. 1. What coping mechanisms do you recommend? A cancer diagnosis significantly impacts not only your physical health, but your mental and emotional well-being. Feelings of depression, anxiety, and fear are very common and considered normal reactions. Your health care team is an indispensable resource for helping you find the support you need to cope. And patients with more social support usually feel less anxious and depressed and report having a better quality of life. 2. What type of testicular cancer do I have and what stage is my tumor? The better informed you are about your specific diagnosis, the better you’ll be able to make decisions on your own behalf. There are two main types of testicular cancer , known as seminomas and non-seminomas. Knowing how advanced the cancer is, or what stage it’s in, will also determine your treatment options. 3. What treatment plan is right for me? The type of treatment your doctor will recommend will depend on your specific diagnosis and type of testicular cancer. Generally speaking, treatment options for testicular cancer include surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. 4. What lifestyle changes should I make? The Testicular Cancer Foundation (TCF) urges all men to be advocates for their own health. This […]

March is National Kidney Month

  • Kidney disease awareness

Approximately 30 million American adults have kidney disease, but most don’t even know it. To help spread awareness, we’d like to share the following article, courtesy of the Urology Care Foundation. March 1 marks the beginning of National Kidney Month, a time to raise awareness about your kidney health and generate support for those affected by such conditions as kidney stones, kidney infections and kidney disease. It’s also a time when the Urology Care Foundation, the nation’s leading nonprofit urological health foundation, encourages the public to make direct, positive and healthy changes in their lives to keep their kidneys healthy and happy. The kidneys are a pair of bean-shaped organs that are about the size of a small fist and sit on each side of the spine, above the waist. Their primary job is to clean the blood and produce urine to rid the body of waste. They also help make red blood cells, maintain a balance of salt and other nutrients in your body, keep your bones healthy and help control your blood pressure. Your kidneys can become damaged with little to no warning. Kidney disease is known as the “silent epidemic” because if often shows no signs until it is more advanced. High blood pressure and diabetes are two leading causes of kidney disease. Other risk factors include heart disease, obesity, high cholesterol and a family history. Older adults, Hispanics, African-Americans and American Indians are at a higher risk for developing kidney disease. “Most people don’t realize how important the kidneys are to our well-being, which is why it’s important to look after them,” said Richard A. Memo, MD chair of the Urology Care Foundation. “If you are at risk for kidney disease, talk to your doctor about having your kidney function checked as this disease is one that can be prevented or slowed down if caught early.” A few simple ways to keep the kidney happy and healthy: Drinking plenty of water Not smoking Eating a healthy diet Keeping your weight in check Staying fit and active Monitoring and keeping regular control of your blood pressure and […]

Did you throw caution to the wind on Valentine’s Day?

  • STD on Valentine's Day

Did you throw caution to the wind on Valentine’s Day? A tongue-in-cheek question to bring up a serious discussion about sexually transmitted infections (STIs), also referred to as sexually transmitted diseases (STDs); i.e. the infections you get from another person through sexual contact. There are more than 20 known types of STDs/STIs and, each year, over 20 million people in the United States are infected. They are spread through fluids in the body, during vaginal, oral or anal sex; however, some STDs can be transmitted through infected blood, such as among people sharing infected drug needles, or a mother may infect her child during pregnancy, childbirth, or while nursing. The good news is that most STDs can be treated and cured; but, in many cases, there are no symptoms at all. When symptoms do occur, they can show up in a variety of ways… Men may experience the following symptoms: Burning or itching in the penis A drip (discharge) from the penis Pain around pelvis Sores, bumps or blisters on penis, anus, or mouth Burning and pain with urine or with bowel movements Having to go to the bathroom often Women may experience the following symptoms: Burning or itching in the vagina A discharge or odor from the vagina Pain around the pelvis Bleeding from the vagina that is not normal Pain deep inside during sex Sores, bumps or blisters in the vagina, anus, or mouth Burning and pain with urine or with bowel movements Having to go to the bathroom often The only way to avoid an STI/STD is to avoid sexual contact with an infected person. Other protections include: Always using a condom, and using it correctly, during sex Limiting sexual relations to only one, infection-free, long-term partner Limiting the number of sexual partners Using clean needles if you are injecting drugs If you have reason to believe you have an STI/STD, or think you may have been exposed to one, please call the Urology Group of Princeton to schedule an appointment. Most STIs/STDs can be completely cured with antibiotics; however, some are incurable but can be controlled […]

Meet Our Doctors

Our greatest satisfaction comes from taking care of our patients. Our goal is to provide them with the highest level of expertise, as well as continuity of care.

Dr. Barry Rossman

Dr. Barry Rossman

M.D.

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Dr. Alexander Vukasin

Dr. Alexander Vukasin

M.D.

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Dr. Karen Latzko

Dr. Karen Latzko

D.O.

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Dr. Alexi Wedmid

Dr. Alexei Wedmid

M.D.

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