Important Developments for Advanced Prostate Cancer

Important Developments for Advanced Prostate Cancer

  • Advanced Prostate Cancer treatment

Here are some important developments, surrounding treatment options for advanced prostate cancer, that we are keeping a watchful eye on.

  • A new androgen receptor inhibitor drug, darolutamide, may soon be a treatment option for patients with non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer (nmCRPC). Non-metastatic castration-resistant prostate cancer is a clinical state in which men who are being treated with androgen deprivation therapy (ADT) see their PSA levels begin to rise (indicating the cancer has become resistant to ADT and is starting to grow again), but no metastases are visible yet on scans. Testing results demonstrated that adding darolutamide to ADT delayed metastasis or death (whichever came first) by an average of 22 months compared with the addition of a placebo. This represents a 59% reduction of risk for metastasis or death for patients with nmCRPC. It is too soon to know the impact of this treatment on overall survival, but there is a positive trend, suggesting a nearly 30% reduction in the risk of death. If approved by the FDA, darolutamide would become a third option for patients with nmCRPC, in addition to the current drugs apalutamide and enzalutamide, both of which were FDA-approved last year for the treatment of nmCRPC in combination with ADT.
  • Patients with metastatic “hormone-sensitive” prostate cancer (mHSPC) may soon have another option to slow the growth of their cancer. Metastatic hormone-sensitive prostate cancer have cancer that has spread beyond the prostate and have not yet been treated with ADT.Results have shown that the addition of enzalutamide to ADT reduced the chances of tumor growth or death (whichever came first) by 61% compared with a placebo, in men with mHSPC. This was seen in different types of mHSPC patients – those who had high and low levels of metastases, and whether or not they had already been treated with docetaxel. Again, it is too early to measure total survival, but the results appear somewhat positive.

For more information about advanced prostate cancer, including detection, symptoms, and advanced treatment options, call the Urology Group of Princeton, at 609.924.6487, to schedule an appointment.