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Focus on the Prevention of Urology-Related conditions during Men’s Health Month

The Urology Group of Princeton is pleased to share this informative article, courtesy of the Urology Care Foundation, to raise awareness of urology-related conditions and disease exclusively affecting men, in recognition of Men’s Health Month. UCF Encourages Men to Focus on Prevention during Men’s Health Month Participate in the challenge to jump start a healthy lifestyle Baltimore, MD, June 1, 2021— June marks the start of Men’s Health Month, a time dedicated to making the health of men throughout the world a priority. The Urology Care Foundation, the world’s leading nonprofit urological health foundation, utilizes the month of June to educate and raise awareness of urology-related conditions and disease exclusively affecting men such as prostate cancer, enlarged prostate, testicular cancer, erectile dysfunction and peyronie’s disease. Because of COVID-19, many men may have delayed getting screened for these conditions. Now that safety guidelines have been relaxed, this month is the perfect time to see your doctor and focus on the early detection and treatment of any health condition, as well as techniques to maintain a healthy lifestyle. The Urology Care Foundation is encouraging men to participate in the “Get up and Go!” Challenge during the month of June. The challenge is meant to motivate men to take an active role in their health. Week 1: Get Up and Go Get Screened! Prostate Cancer: Generally, prostate cancer screening is recommended for men who are between the ages of 55 to 69. Some men who are at higher risk for prostate cancer should consider screening as early as age 40-45. This group includes African American men and men with a father, brother or son who has had prostate cancer. Testicular Cancer: Testicular cancer can affect males at any age, but it is most often found in men age 15 to 44 years. With early diagnosis, it can be cured. To catch this cancer early, men are encouraged to learn about the early signs of the disease, learn how to do a testicular self-exam and to talk with a health care provider if there is a suspicious lump, swelling or pain in the area. […]

What is a Bladder Diverticulum?

The Urology Group of Princeton is pleased to share this informative article on bladder diverticulum courtesy of the Urology Care Foundation. What is a Bladder Diverticulum?   A bladder diverticulum is a pouch in the bladder wall that a person may either be born with (“congenital”) or get later (“acquired”). A congenital bladder diverticulum forms when some of the bladder lining pokes through a weak part in the bladder wall. A congenital diverticulum is most often found when you are still a child, and there is often only 1 pouch. They often don’t need to be treated. Acquired bladder diverticula (more than 1 diverticulum) are most often caused by a block in the bladder outlet (such as from a swollen prostate or scars in the urethra), the bladder not working well because of nerve injury or, rarely, from prior bladder surgery. With acquired diverticula, many pouches often form. These are most often seen in older men, who tend to get bladder outlet blocks more often. How Does the Bladder Usually Work? The bladder is a balloon-shaped organ that stores urine, which is made in the kidneys. It is held in place by pelvic muscles in the lower part of your bell. When it isn’t full, the bladder is relaxed. Muscles in the bladder wall allow it to expand as it fills with urine. Nerve signals in your brain let you know that your bladder is getting full. Then you feel the need to go to the bathroom. The brain tells the bladder muscles to squeeze (or “contract”). This forces the urine out of your body through your urethra. Symptoms Most often, bladder diverticula have no direct signs. They are found while looking for causes of other urinary problems. Some problems bladder diverticula can be linked to are: urinary tract infections bladder stones urine flowing backwards into the kidneys (“reflux”) bladder tumors trouble peeing Diagnosis Bladder diverticula can be found with an x-ray test of the bladder. The test is done by filling the bladder with a dye that shows up well in x-rays (called a “contrast”) and taking pictures. Your […]

Interstitial Cystitis(IC)/Bladder Pain Syndrome

The Urology Group of Princeton would like to share this informative article, concerning Interstitial Cystitis(IC)/Bladder Pain Syndrome, courtesy of the Urology Care Foundation. For more information or to address any urology-related concerns, please call the office (609.924.6487) to schedule a consultation and exam. What is Interstitial Cystitis(IC)/Bladder Pain Syndrome? Interstitial cystitis (IC)/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) is a chronic bladder health issue. It is a feeling of pain and pressure in the bladder area. Along with this pain are lower urinary tract symptoms which have lasted for more than 6 weeks, without having an infection or other clear causes. Symptoms range from mild to severe. For some patients the symptoms may come and go, and for others they don’t go away. IC/BPS is not an infection, but it may feel like a bladder infection. Women with IC/BPS may feel pain when having sex. The more severe cases of IC/BPS can affect your life and your loved ones. Some people with IC/BPS have other health issues such as irritable bowel syndrome, fibromyalgia, and other pain syndromes. The bladder and kidneys are part of the urinary system, the organs in our bodies that make, store, and pass urine. You have 2 kidneys that make urine. Then urine is stored in the bladder. The muscles in the lower part of your abdomen hold your bladder in place. How the Urinary System Works When it is not full of urine, the bladder is relaxed. When nerve signals in your brain let you know that your bladder is getting full, you feel the need to pass urine. If your bladder is working normally, you can put off urination for some time. Once you are ready to pass urine, the brain sends a signal to the bladder. Then the bladder muscles squeeze (or “contract”). This forces the urine out through the urethra, the tube that carries urine from your body. The urethra has muscles called sphincters. They help keep the urethra closed so urine doesn’t leak before you’re ready to go to the bathroom. These sphincters relax when the bladder contracts. Symptoms Pain The symptoms of IC/BPS […]

Meet Our Doctors

Our greatest satisfaction comes from taking care of our patients. Our goal is to provide them with the highest level of expertise, as well as continuity of care.

Dr. Barry Rossman

Dr. Barry Rossman

M.D.

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Dr. Alexander Vukasin

Dr. Alexander Vukasin

M.D.

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Dr. Karen Latzko

Dr. Karen Latzko

D.O.

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Dr. Alexi Wedmid

Dr. Alexei Wedmid

M.D.

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