Blog

How Urology Can Affect Sexual Health

Your Sexual Health is Important People often keep quiet about their sexual health. We tend to keep this part of our lives private. But really, sexual health may be key for our relationships and self-esteem. Dr. Akanksha Mehta, Associate Professor from the Emory University School of Medicine and an expert in this topic says, “Our sexual health is linked to our overall physical health, urologic health and mental health.” Dr. Mehta hopes people will talk with their doctors about sexual health. She says, “I think there is too much false information online. It can be hard to distinguish between reliable and non-reliable sources. Good sexual health starts by talking with a doctor you trust. Doctors can direct you to the most reliable information. If they cannot answer your questions, they will refer you to someone who can.” What urologic conditions could affect sexual health? Many urologic conditions could affect sexual health. For example: An infection or inflammation, like: Prostatitis – pain in and around the pelvic area, starting with the prostate. It can happen to men of all ages. Some causes include infection from bacteria and inflammation from injury or infection. Orchitis – swelling or pain in one or both testicles, usually from an infection or virus. Epididymitis – swelling or pain in the back of the testicle in the coiled tube (epididymis) that stores and carries sperm. Urinary Tract Infections (UTIs) – when bacteria gets into your urine and travels up to your bladder. UTIs are very common. Interstitial cystitis/bladder pain syndrome (BPS) – a chronic bladder health issue. It is a feeling of pain and pressure in the bladder area. Along with this pain are lower urinary tract symptoms that have lasted for more than six weeks, without having an infection or other clear causes. These can lead to painful sex. Some people wonder if they’ll put their partner at risk. A physical concern, like: Urinary Incontinence – leaking of urine that you cannot control. It affects both men and women. Overactive bladder – the name for a group of urinary symptoms. It is not a disease. Some […]

Grow a Mo, Save a Bro!

Meant to inspire donations, conversations, and real change for men’s health issues, the phrase “Grow a Mo, Save a Bro” is the slogan for Movember, aka No-Shave November or Mustache November. This month long, annual event began in Australia, in 2004, when a group of friends decided to raise awareness of the need for early cancer detection, diagnosis and effective treatments for men. Ultimately, they hoped to reduce the number of preventable deaths faced by men. To raise awareness, they encourage men to grow a mustache to remind each of us of the importance of men’s health. Since 2003, The Movember Foundation has empowered millions of men and women to join the global men’s health movement. The connections created and the conversations generated have helped to raise over $700 million and helped fund more than 1,200 breakthrough men’s health projects in 21 countries! Movember is focused on three specific health issues to men: Prostate cancer Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer in men in the U.S. This walnut-sized and shaped gland tends to grow bigger as a man ages. If detected early, men have a 98% chance of survival beyond five years. If detected late, men have only a 26% chance of survival beyond five years. Testicular cancer Testicular cancer is the most common cancer in men aged 15-34 in the U.S. In most cases, the outcome for men with testicular cancer is very good — a 95% chance of survival. Mental health and suicide prevention Statistically, three out of four suicides are men. Although Movember shines a spotlight on these often overlooked men’s issues, every day of the year should be a day devoted to awareness and prevention of prostate and testicular cancers as well as depression and suicide. Here are some positive steps we can all take… Stay connected with other male friends to catch up and check in on one another. Have open conversations; be there for each other, listening and giving of your time. At the age of 40, talk to your doctor about prostate cancer and having a prostate specific antigen (PSA) test. […]

Low Testosterone Symptoms and Treatment

Testosterone is the sex hormone that helps boys become men; it is key during puberty and the development of male physical features. Testosterone helps men maintain muscle strength and mass, facial and body hair, and a deeper voice; it is also needed for men to produce sperm. Testosterone levels can affect men’s sex drive, erections, mood, muscle mass, and bone density. After age 30, most men begin to experience a gradual decline in testosterone; however, there are a number of other possible causes for low testosterone, including: Injury to the testicles Testicular cancer or treatment for testicular cancer Hormonal disorders Infection HIV/AIDS Chronic liver or kidney disease Type 2 diabetes Obesity Some medicines and genetic conditions can also lower a man’s testosterone score, and, in some cases, the cause is unknown. There are many sexual and non-sexual symptoms that can be indicative of low testosterone. Sexual signs include: Diminished/Low sex drive Weaker and/or fewer erections Inability to maintain an erection Non sexual signs include: Increase in body fat Diminished energy Reduced muscle mass Depression Anemia (low iron) Reduced Bone Mass Having a gradual decline in your testosterone level as you age is to be expected; however, treatment may be considered if you’re experiencing symptoms related to low testosterone. A blood test can accurately determine your testosterone level; a man’s normal total testosterone range is about 300 nanograms per deciliter (ng/dL) to about 800ng/dL, depending on the lab. If you have any concerns, or experience any of the associated low testosterone symptoms listed above, contact the Urology Group of Princeton to schedule an appointment. The board certified physician/surgeons at the Urology Group of Princeton are highly trained to evaluate your symptoms, perform applicable tests, and develop the proper treatment plan, which may include Testosterone Replacement Therapy (TRT).

Meet Our Doctors

Our greatest satisfaction comes from taking care of our patients. Our goal is to provide them with the highest level of expertise, as well as continuity of care.

Dr. Barry Rossman

Dr. Barry Rossman

M.D.

Read More
Dr. Alexander Vukasin

Dr. Alexander Vukasin

M.D.

Read More
Dr. Karen Latzko

Dr. Karen Latzko

D.O.

Read More
Dr. Alexi Wedmid

Dr. Alexei Wedmid

M.D.

Read More